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This Is What Victory At Standing Rock Looks Like

Posted By on December 5, 2016 in Written Content | 0 comments

This Is What Victory At Standing Rock Looks Like

OCETI SAKOWIN CAMPGROUND, N.D The Standing Rock Sioux tribe and their supporters celebrated a historic victory Sunday after federal authorities halted construction of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it had denied the final easement required for the $3.8 billion project to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota. The Army said it will now explore alternative routes pending an environmental impact study.

The 1,172-mile pipeline starts at the Bakken Formation in northwest North Dakota near the Canadian border and runs southeast to southern Illinois. 

The Standing Rock Sioux, which had been joined in a months-long protest by environmental, human rights and social justice activists, opposed the oil pipeline due to concerns over water contamination, environmental destruction and damage to ancestral sites.

“My hands go up to all the water protectors who have stood up to protect tribal treaty rights and to protect Mother Earth,” Brian Cladoosby, president of the National Congress of American Indians, said in a statement Sunday. “Thank you for Standing For Standing Rock.”

See more images from the victory below.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Dakota Access Pipeline protesters celebrate as they march back to the Oceti Sakowin campground after they found out the Army Corps of Engineers denied the easement to drill under Lake Oahe on Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Drummers at the Oceti Sakowin campground perform a victory song.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Lance King, 33, an Oglala Lakota from Lyle, South Dakota, celebrates with Kayti Bunny after the announcement that the Army Corps of Engineers denied the easement to drill under Lake Oahe for the Dakota Access Pipeline.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Lita Boyd, a veteran of the U.S. Army, leads a group of veterans to the checkin area at the Oceti Sakowin campground north of Cannon Ball, N.D.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Cornel West speaks during a multi-faith congregation at the Oceti Sakowin campground.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Dakota Access Pipeline protesters celebrate after learning that the Army Corps of Engineers denied the drilling permit to drill under Lake Oahe near Cannon Ball, North Dakota.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Tamara Bliss Sharp of Oakland, Calif. prays at the Oceti Sakowin campground.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Dakota Access Pipeline protesters sing and celebrate after the Army Corps of Engineers announced they won’t be granting the easement to drill under Lake Oahe.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Thousands gather in the main area of the Oceti Sakowin campground to celebrate after the Army Corps of Engineers announced they will not be granting a drilling permit.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Evan Porter, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, checks into the Oceti Sakowin campground.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Horse riders meet at the Oceti Sakowin campground.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Tamara Bliss Sharp of Oakland, Calif. holds a pair of eagle feathers as she prays at the Oceti Sakowin campground.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Dakota Access Pipeline protesters participate in a victory march to the Oceti Sakowin campground.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Rob McHabey, right, a U.S. Navy veteran, walks with Ben Wright, left, a U.S. Army Veteran, at the Oceti Sakowin campground.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Dakota Access Pipeline protesters congregate on North Dakota Highway 1806 north of Cannon Ball, N.D.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Dakota Access Pipeline protesters celebrate as they watch a group of veterans march into the Oceti Sakaowin camp.

  • Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images

    Troy Fairbanks, right, of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe cheers after hearing Chief Arvol Looking Horse announce to members of over 300 nations that thepipeline’s construction has been halted.

  • Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images

    Activist Brenda Cohen cries tears of joy as she celebrates at Oceti Sakowin camp on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

  • JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

    Activists hold hands during a prayer circle as they try to surround the entire camp at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

  • Josh Morgan for The Huffington Post

    Chief Arvol Looking Horse arrives to the Oceti Sakowin campground north.

  • JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

    Activists celebrate at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

  • Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images

    A Sioux American flag hangs upside down at the encampment at Oceti Sakowin camp on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

  • Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images

    Troy Fairbanks, right, of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, holds back tears as he hugs a friend after hearing Chief Arvol Looking Horse announce, to members of over 300 nations, that the US Army Corps of Engineers will no longer grant access to the Dakota Access Pipeline to put their pipe line on the boundary of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

  • Stephanie Keith / Reuters

    People celebrate in Oceti Sakowin camp as “water protectors” continue to demonstrate against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.

  • Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images

    Activist Brenda Cohen cries tears of joy as she celebrates at Oceti Sakowin camp on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

  • Scott Olson/Getty Images

    Native American and other activists celebrate after learning an easement had been denied.

  • Stephanie Keith / Reuters

    People celebrate in Oceti Sakowin camp.

  • Scott Olson/Getty Images

    Native American and other activists celebrate.

  • Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images

    Native americans lift up their hands to celebrate their victory.

  • Stephanie Keith / Reuters

    Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader of the Sioux nation, participates in a ceremony in Oceti Sakowin camp.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/standing-rock-photos_us_5844c3b2e4b0c68e0481849f